B&W 38 MIN 1.33:1

DVD INCLUDES:

-DIRECTOR/PRODUCER COMMENTARY
-EDITOR/PRODUCER/DP PAUL BUSETTI COMMENTARY
-TEN SUNDAYS IAN ALBETSKI COMMENTARY
-BRIDGET DEVLIN BURKE & FRANCIS ABBEY COMMENTARY
-DAVE COOPERMAN COMMENTARY
-TRAILER



"Sweetheart", as it would eventually be called out of convenience, was originally envisioned as a horror film. The first idea that director Colin Lamb told me about in the fall of 2005 was of a couple camping in the woods. There would be some sort of unexplained phenomena that the husband would bring back with him. Once they had returned home, he would become increasingly confrontational, jealous, and begin sabotaging his wife at the risk of her health and sanity. We didn't make that movie. Instead, we took out any supernatural elements and decided that a change in environment would provoke the negative aspects previously dormant inside the husband.

Sometime early in the New Year was when Colin showed me the first draft of the script. I'm still jealous I didn't come up with the title. At over 30 pages, It was on the long side for a short film and had more characters and locations than we had dealt with before. Colin was green and myself and (co-producer) Chris Kiros were both in postproduction on our own films that had just wrapped. The film came very close to never happening and easily could have been forgotten. But we went ahead and wound up casting actors Ian Novick, Bridget Devlin Burke, Tara Bowen, and Francis Abbey who we would continue working with years later.

The shoot was scheduled for 12 days throughout spring 2006.

DAY 1
You know something is wrong when first days go this well. Ron (Ian Novick) assaults Fletcher (Francis Abbey) in an alleyway. We shoot in the alley behind Ben & Jerry's in Old Town. The unexpected rain made the scene even better.

DAY 2-4
We shoot all the interior apartment scenes for the couple. Piss poor set design and an inability to come up with new ideas on set resulted in the abbreviation or total deletion of the scenes shot in the apartment. One of the earliest ideas involved Claire (Tara Bowen) stepping on broken glass after Ron has drunkenly shattered a bottle on the kitchen floor. Unfortunately this was one of the scenes that was removed from the final cut. Ian Novick went to scary places on the final night of filming in the apartment when we kept the cameras rolling as he silently spilled bullets all over the kitchen table and then loaded a handgun.

DAY 5
Ron is confronted in the park by the specter of his possible future self (Dave Cooperman). We paid a homeless guy in the park $20 to get off the set and not steal our equipment. Novick and Cooperman did a take that made Chris, Colin, and myself hold our collective breath. That's the take we used.

DAY 6
The first scene with Tara Bowen and Bridget Devlin Burke, who would reunite years later in Cannibal Cheerleader Camp. We would return to Perk Up Coffee Shop in 2008 to shoot the opening scene for Boxing Day.

DAY 7
Memorial Day. The sound of the motorcycles on their way to Rolling Thunder outside the motel, which was located mere feet away from the Capitol Beltway ramp on Richmond Highway. It was hot as hell and we worked till dawn. We shot in the exact same motel room 6 years later for Veil.

DAY 8
We considered this the de facto final day of filming. We shot a 9 page dialogue scene in The Flying Fish restaurant on King Street. It was the wrap day for Bridget and Francis and we all drank at the restaurant bar. 14 months later we would premiere the film on the same block.

DAY 9
I feel like the photography of the film finally falls into place a little late on the second to last day of principal. We shoot at Roseina's restaurant.

DAY 10
Colin makes a cameo as does my wife.

DAY 11-12
Miscellaneous exterior/establishing shots around DC. Eventually, footage would be shot in Virginia, DC, New York, and New Jersey.

DECEMBER
Editing begins in New York. I tell Colin the movie will be done in 4 weeks.

JANUARY-JUNE
The film is completely reconstructed over the next 6 months. The original 52 minute cut is slashed to a lean 38.

JUNE 28
"Sweetheart" premieres at the Old Town Theater before a full house. It was the first film to show after the theater's grand reopening and they received final approval from the Fire Marshall 3 hours before the show. The crowd appaluded at the title.



(L-R) Paul Busetti, Colin Lamb, Bridget Devlin Burke,
Tara Bowen, Lauren Scott, Ian Novick, Francis Abbey

 

 

HOW DID YOU LOSE YOUR SOUL SWEETHEART (2007)

WRITTEN & DIRECTED BY COLIN LAMB

PRODUCED BY PAUL BUSETTI, COLIN LAMB & CHRIS KIROS

NOISY STREETS AND LATE NIGHTS DRIVE A YOUNG WRITER
IN THE CITY TO VIOLENCE.

IAN NOVICK.........................................................RON
TARA BOWEN.......................................................CLAIRE
BRIDGET DEVLIN BURKE....................................SARAH
FRANCIS ABBEY..................................................FLETCHER
LAUREN SCOTT....................................................JODI
MAHI BADWAL.....................................................THE MANAGER
AMY BETZ............................................................JEN
DAVE COOPERMAN.............................................WILLIE


















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