B&W 17 MINS 1.33:1

-DIRECTOR COMMENTARY






On a sunday afternoon at my grandmother's house, I happened to catch a few minutes of David Cronenberg's The Fly. I was probably about 8 years old and I had never seen anything like it before. Even heavily edited for network television, you couldn't hide the perversity in watching a human being fall apart before your eyes. It's still one of my all time favorite movies and it turned me on to other great Cronenberg flicks like Scanners, The Brood, and The Dead Zone.

In winter 2005, when I was thinking about what to do next, I kept coming back to the ideas of guilt, adultery, and greed. I settled on the concept of a machine that would heal your injuries. Something so revolutionary that it would bring the inventor untold wealth and fame. But one of the unexpected side effects was that it worked too well. The machine could not differentiate between physical and emotional damage. Whether real or imagined, your feelings of guilt, sorrow, and inadaquecy would be left behind after using it. Just like Seth Brundle in The Fly, the user, once passing through, would feel better, stronger, and more evolved than before. It would be clear that the machine did work as intended, however the validity of the after effects would be more ambiguous. Other plot points came later, such as the plans for the machine originating from another man, who had since gone mad and comitted suicide, and the inventor's wife being unable to conceive. I wanted to play around with chronology as well, and open with Leonard (the inventor) immediately after the murder of his associate Clausen. After that it would be shown that Clausen and Leonard's wife Josephine were enagaged in a poorly concealed affair. Just like the main character in The Clockmaker, Leonard is an American man who is a failure at home. However, unlike the unnamed protaganist in the previous film, Leonard is granted more sympathy due to the appearacne that he is being manipulated because of his intelligence and desire to give his wife all the things she desires. It is this very desire that starts the chain of events that lead to his acceptance of the dead man's work and the introduction of his wife to her future lover and possible conspirator. The film is seen 100% through the eyes of Leonard, so the viewer never gets a precise idea of how many of his fears are fabricated.

The film was shot over 5 days in early spring 2006. I primarily used the Canon GL1, but also the Panasonic DVX100, Samsung SC-D363, and Panasonic PV-GS500 . The crew consisted only of myself and the two co-producers. Peter Driscoll was cast as the inventor Leonard and Christopher Andersen played the scheming contemporary Clausen. Maragartia Timothee played the wife Josephine with a real dizzy sadness and the fear of living with a man who is turning into a monster. Edwin Albetski returned to play Baxter, the benefactor who wants a peek at the mysterious invention. The editing was done in roughly 3 months and the film was premiered in August 2006. After the premiere, I changed the ending twice. First removing the dialogue between Leonard and his dying wife. This eliminated the confusion people had about the authenticity of the affair, which was always meant to be completely factual. Unfortunatley, this also eliminated the the conflict he has about whether ot not to use the machine on his wife to save her life. Does he not use it because it would make her less human, or does he not want her to forget the hurt she caused him? The second change I made was a removal of the final voiceover "I called myself an inventor, but what had I invented?". I also recut the opening scene and added my own heavy breathing to play underneath the beginning credits. The juxtoposition of the elegance of classical music at a black tie event and the heavy breathing of a middle aged man whose hands are caked in blood is something that wasn't in the intitial incarnation. I've screened the film twice in New York and in Virginia since making these changes.












ANTIDOTE SEVEN
(2006)


WRITTEN & DIRECTED BY PAUL BUSETTI

PRODUCED BY PAUL BUSETTI, COLIN LAMB & CHRIS KIROS

AN INVENTOR LEAVES A PILE OF BODIES IN HIS WAKE AS HE STRUGGLES TO UNDERSTAND THE SIDE EFFECTS OF HID LATEST CREATION


PETER DRISCOLL...................................LEONARD
CHRISTOPHER ANDERSEN....................CLAUSEN
MARGARITA TIMOTHEE..........................JOSEPHINE
EDWIN ALBETSKI....................................BAXTER



 

 













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